Save Dorothy’s Ruby Slippers Before the Wicked Witch’s Hourglass Runs Out

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History is heading down the Yellow Brick Road on a Kickstarter campaign to raise money to conserve  Dorothy’s Ruby Slippers.  The Smithsonian is asking the public to help save the slippers, trying to raise $300,000. Over half of the money needed has already been raised in two days.  Judy Garland wore the slippers in the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz.           

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Courtesy of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, Washington, D.C.

Museum spokesperson Melinda Machado tells me that the slippers have “wear and tear and fading over time you’d expect for something which has been so cherished by the public.” 4e1309997b3410a8e7e02c982c676a68_original

She said the slippers have been damaged by light and need to be restored and preserved in a new state-of-the-art display case.  She said that an anonymous donor bought them at an auction and gave them to the Smithsonian in 1979.  Aside  from cleaning them and briefly loaning them out to places like the Victoria and Albert Museum in England and to Oprah Winfrey’s Show, Machado says this national treasure has been on  continuous display in the American Stories exhibit at the museum.

Kickstarter is a third-party online funding platform where the goal must be met within 30 days.   The launch began on October 17th.  If the project succeeds in reaching its funding goal, Kickstarter says backers’ credit cards are charged when time expires. If the project falls short, no one is charged. Funding  is all-or-nothing.  If the goal is exceeded, the museum will use the extra funding for outreach and educational programs.

The public can back the project on the Kickstarter page, si.edu/kickstarter .  The campaign ends Nov. 16.39c4d0fd73afb878350564ab83deebd5_original

In 2018 the slippers will be moved to a new pop culture exhibit tentatively called On With the Show along with American treasures such as Muhammad Ali’s training robe, Jim Henson’s Muppets, John Coltrane’s saxophone, R2-D2 from Star Wars.

dolls-373469_640-1Another campaign is raising money for other iconic treasures to be displayed at the National Over the Hill Museum in Palm Beach, Florida.  These items  include my bubble cap, stretchy pants and retired flip phone.  So far $1.50 has been raised that was pledged by my mother.

the-wizard-of-oz-516687_960_720You can follow the Ruby Slippers campaign on social media using the hashtag #KeepThemRuby. Tony Award-winning Broadway costume designer William Ivey Long  has created an exclusive, custom Ruby Slippers design for many of the rewards given to project backers.  These include rewards for contributions from $10 to $100, including digital and printed posters, a decal, tote bag and t-shirt.  Long will sign and “hand-glitterize” posters at the $500 reward level. Other rewards include a custom hand-sewn replica pair of the Ruby Slippers by Randy Struthers, and a behind-the-scenes look  at the Ruby Slippers at the museum.

Just Follow the Yellow Brick Road

hunger-413685_960_720 I was at the hairdresser reading a magazine when I spotted an article about the inventor of the self-wringing Miracle Mop.  Here was a gadget that could free me from the drudgery of housework.  But the miracle for me would be if someone else actually used it.  I find cleaning my house is as much fun as waiting on a long line at motor vehicle, watching paint dry, or better yet filing my taxes.  I dread it.  I’ve gone from being super mom, to Debbie Downer.   I just can’t find the energy to do anything.   I haven’t cooked a single meal in weeks.

I’m just not up to much these days.  I haven’t done any laundry in months.

I’ve done nothing but eat bon-bons and watch reruns of the Wizard of Oz.  I feel like a desperate housewife wishing there was a place over the rainbow without ring around the collar or under the toilet bowl.  Brides have no idea what they’re getting into.  On your wedding day, they should come clean and hand you a toilet brush and a bottle of clorox instead of a bouquet.

“Fork ’em over,” my oldest daughter  said tugging on the pair of ruby red shoes I  snatched from my youngest daughter’s dress-up box.  You’re nuts, face it!” my oldest  said as a dozen boxes of Judy Garland memorabilia I ordered on eBay arrived.  “You need help,” she told me.

I thought I needed help with the dishes, but apparently that wasn’t what she had in mind.   My doctor has been conducting  tests, but my daughter doesn’t think he’s making  progress.   She asked the insurance company for  a  therapist.  They suggested  Dr. Harry Pillsberry.

“I must say this condition is a new one for me,” he said as he tugged on the stubble on his chin looking me up and down.  I was still wearing the ruby red shoes.  He muttered something about Yellow Brick Road fever.  He told me that the fever had caused a brain malfunction and said it was common in guilt-ridden mothers who ignore their kids.  “Do you believe that a broomstick will solve all of your problems?” he probed.

“I’m actually thinking of buying a miracle mop,” I said.